New Youth Council Member – Anthony C FRC 8574

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Personal Pronouns: he/they

Hi, I’m Anthony! I’m a grade 12 student and the captain of FRC Audeamus 8574—even though it’s only our second year, I’ve been participating in robotics since elementary school. From trying to debug my FLL team’s robot on the way to the field (perhaps foreshadowing my FRC experience) to trying to use artificial intelligence in Sumobot tournaments (it didn’t turn out well), I’m lucky to have experienced such a wide spectrum of robotics. I’ve also tried some other things along the way like returning to mentor my middle school’s FLL team and repeatedly trying to contact astronauts for robotics teams. It was a dream come true for me when I co-founded my current FRC team. It was during the pandemic so everything was a bit uncertain, but we somehow recruited interested students, raised the money, put in the requisite work, and eventually went much further than I originally thought we would. It felt magical. When I’m not thinking about robotics, I’m probably coding (I’ve been trying to contribute to open-source software that I regularly use), gaming (especially Minecraft), or reading. Finally, I also enjoy cryptography, cryptocurrency, chess, chocolate, and other things—not all of them start with C, I promise!

Outside of robotics what are some of your hobbies?

Besides robotics, most of my hobbies are tech-related: coding, tinkering, learning, gaming, and all that. But it’s not all STEM: I also love reading (currently struggling through Gravity’s Rainbow), writing, swimming, and photography.
Where do you see yourself in ten years?
Hopefully, I will use my knowledge and skills to contribute to something that meaningfully impacts others. If not, I’ll settle for being able to mess around with computers and other electronics to my heart’s content.
If you could have any animal as a pet, what would it be?
A fox, because they’re objectively the best animal. They’re cute, insanely smart, and combine the best attributes of dogs and cats. Unfortunately, they’re extremely hard to domesticate. At least it’s not impossible, right?